The Lonely Speck Teaser

This is the new Lonely Speck video teaser that will be featured on my future videos.

When I made a solo trip to Panamint Valley to capture the Milky Way, I did so almost entirely for the intention of making this time lapse sequence. It was made on my custom built time lapse slider on a very windy night on the Panamint Playa. This particular sequence is made with 1 minute exposures using the Rokinon 24mm f/1.4 lens on a Canon 6D.

I also piggybacked a rotary drive mount onto the slider, allowing me to track the Milky Way as it moved across the sky. The slide was only 3 feet long and allowed for a total of about 250 stills, just about 10 seconds of video. The result was nothing short of amazing but I’ve had trouble finding a place for this footage. It stands out so much from the rest of my other time lapse sequences that I felt I needed somewhere special to feature it.

As I was finishing my first video tutorial on noise reduction, I realized that the video needed some sort of title showing that it was a lonelyspeck.com production. So, I pulled up this old footage and put the sequence to an open song I found on Archive.org called “Glitch” by the Japanese Artist Anoice on their 2008 Out of Season album. This short sequence will be the opener for most of my future motion picture projects. I hope you like it.

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Ian Norman

Creator at Lonely Speck
Ian Norman, co-founder and creator of The Photon Collective and Lonely Speck. Ian is a full time traveler, photographer and entrepreneur. In February 2013, he called it quits on his 9-to-5 to pursue a lifestyle of photography. Follow Ian's photography adventures on Instagram.

4 Responses

  1. Holger November 23, 2016 / 5:04 am

    Amazing Video! Its on my bucket list to see this in real life. Thanks for this awesome work… Greetings from germany

  2. ahmad shrief October 25, 2015 / 8:13 am

    hi Ian , hope you are fine
    that’s an amazing work congratulation for such a beauty
    but i have a question i know you used the rotary to track the milky way so when you make a 60 second shutter open shot don’t end up with a star trail
    but what i don’t understand is how the foreground is still sharp
    if the rotary move in the 60 second shutter long make the foreground to be messed up ?!

  3. Jens February 25, 2015 / 6:30 am

    Awesome video! Stunning! Did you shoot that out with a standard out of the box 6D or was the one you used special modified for astro-Shooting (H-alpha / SII)? That I would love to know. Thx in advance. Jens

    • Ian Norman March 2, 2015 / 5:15 pm

      Regular old 6D!

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